Falls and Osteoporosis

Intervention Reason

Interventions that can't be recommended to prevent falls

Interventions that can't be recommended to prevent falls

Brisk walking
  • No evidence that it reduces the risk of falling – however there may be other health benefits.
  • Unsupervised brisk walking programme could increase the risk of falling in postmenopausal women with an upper limb fracture in the previous year.
  Interventions that cannot be recommended due to insufficient evidence
Low intensity exercise combined with incontinence programmes
  • No evidence that it reduces the incidence of falls in older people in extended care settings.
Untargeted group exercise
  • Little evidence that exercise not individually prescribed for older people living in the community are effective in falls prevention – should not be discouraged as a means of health promotion.
Cognitive / behavioural interventions
  • No evidence that Cognitive / behavioural interventions alone reduce the incidence of falls in older people living in the community who are of unknown risk status.
  • No evidence that complex interventions, in which group activities included education, a behaviour modification programme, advice and exercise interventions, are effective in falls prevention with older people living in the community.
Referral for correction of visual impairment
  • No evidence that referral for corrective vision as a single intervention for older people living in the community is effective in reducing the number
  • Vision assessment and referral has been a component of successful multifactorial falls prevention programmes.
Vitamin D
  • Emerging evidence that correction of vitamin D deficiency / insufficiency may reduce the propensity for falling, however there is uncertainty about the relative contribution to fracture reduction and the dose and route of administration.
Hip Protectors
  • No evidence for the effectiveness of hip protectors to prevent fractures when offered to older people living in extended care settings or in their own homes.
Some evidence that hip protectors are effective with older people living in extended care settings who are considered high risk.

Source: NICE 2013


Last updated Friday, 22nd April 2016