Teenage Pregnancy

National and local strategies (best practices)

National and international evidence has shown that a whole system approach has most impact on teenage pregnancy reduction. Figure 3 shows the 10 key elements of an effective local teenage pregnancy strategy. Each key element is an essential component of any teenage pregnancy strategy to ensure a whole system approach[1]

Figure 3: Translating evidence into a ‘whole systems’ approach: ten factors for an effective local strategy

Figure 3: Translating evidence into a ‘whole systems’ approach: ten factors for an effective local strategy

Teenage pregnancy reduction is a priority at national level as a Public Health Outcomes Indicator, and locally through Central Bedfordshire’s’ Children and Young People’s Plan and the Health and Wellbeing Strategy.

The national policies are:

A Framework for Sexual Health Improvement in England:

  • Continue to reduce the rate of under 16 and under 18 conceptions is one of four priorities

Child Poverty Strategy:

  • Under 18 conception rate a measure of national and local progress

Troubled Families:

  • Overlapping risk factors for teenage pregnancy

Raising the Participation Age:

  • From 2013 all 17 year olds in education, training or work based learning and all 18 year olds – until their 18th birthday - from 2015

Public Health Outcomes Framework:

  • Under 18 conception rate and other indicators disproportionately affect teenage parents and their children

School Nurse Development Programme:

  • New School Nurse Sexual Health Pathway

NICE Public Health Guidance on contraceptive services:

  • Recommendation 8: Providing school and education-based contraceptive services

 


[1] Teenage Pregnancy Knowledge Exchange, Translating evidence into a ‘whole systems’ approach: ten factors for an effective local strategy, University of Bedfordshire, Luton, 2014.


Last updated Thursday, 20th October 2016